Throwback Review: Nick Drake – Pink Moon (1972)

British musician Nick Drake was only 26 years old when he committed suicide via an overdose of antidepressants on November 25th, 1974. He had released three records at that point, the latest being Pink Moon, but none had been particularly successful. Drake suffered from severe depression and anxiety for most of his life, and refused much of the promotional material for his albums. After his death, Drake became largely unknown for decades. It was not until Volkswagen used his song “Pink Moon” was used for an advertisement in 1999, that his material was rediscovered and exploded into popularity. And thank god for that. Each of Drake’s three albums are special and wonderful in their own way, but his last, Pink Moon, is one of the most stunningly gorgeous albums ever created.

Featuring nothing more than Drake’s voice and guitar (and a tiny bit of piano in the title track), Pink Moon is a master craft in minimalism. His small, confined voice glides eloquently across his thin, small but rough, but ethereal guitar strumming. Many of the lyrical meanings, such as the significance of the pink moon, were lost with Drake, but that just lends to mystique of the music.

Pink Moon is short (only 28 minutes) but each short little song encapsulates a tiny piece of an immeasurable¬†talent who left the world too early, and had much more to share. “Things Behind the Sun” is the final track on Pink Moon and features the lyric “And now we rise / And we are everywhere” that also appears on his gravestone. With Drake finally at the popularity level that alluded him in life, it can be safely be said that his music is indeed everywhere. Thankfully so, because the world should hear this record.

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